• Departmental profile

    DATA NOT YET RECEIVED FROM DEPARTMENT

  • Faculty Member

    Faculty: Faculty of Fishery Sciences
    Head of the Department. : Dr. Sangram Keshari Rout

    DR. RAMAN KUMAR TRIVEDI

    Qualification : M.F.Sc. & Ph. D.
    Designation : Professor
    Email : ramankumart@rediffmail.com
    Phone : 9432491149

    PUBLICATIONS

    NATIONAL: 22
    INTERNATIONAL: 4
    POPULAR ARTICLES: 4
    MANUAL: 4
    OTHERS: 0

    STUDENT GUIDANCE

    PASSOUT: 14
    CURRENT: 5

    DR. SANGRAM KESHARI ROUT

    Qualification : M.F.Sc. & Ph. D.
    Designation : Professor
    Phone: 8100682955

    PUBLICATIONS

    NATIONAL: 76
    INTERNATIONAL: 35
    POPULAR ARTICLES: 16
    MANUAL: 3
    OTHERS:

    STUDENT GUIDANCE

    PASSOUT: 21
    CURRENT: 0

    DR. BIPUL KUMAR DAS

    Qualification : M.Sc. & Ph. D.
    Designation : Professor
    Email : bkdaskly@gmail.com
    Phone: 9433754489

    PUBLICATIONS

    NATIONAL: 32
    INTERNATIONAL: 6
    POPULAR ARTICLES: 7
    MANUAL:
    OTHERS:

    STUDENT GUIDANCE

    PASSOUT: 17
    CURRENT: 5

  • Course

    Course offered: * Compulsory for Master’s programme; ** Compulsory for Doctoral programme
  • Project Completed / ongoing

    Ongoing
    Sl.No. Title Name of PI Period Funding Agency Budget (Rs. in lakhs)
    1 Development of Climate-Resilient Aquaculture Strategies for Sagar and Basanti Blocks of Indian Sundarban (NICRA) Dr. Raman Kumar Trivedi 2011-2016 ICAR, New Delhi 100.000
    2 Determination of the conservation value of the Mangroves of Indian Sunderban Dr. Raman Kumar Trivedi 2014-2016 NCSCM Ministry of Environment & Forests Govt. of India 11.000
    3 Development of Seed Bank and Propagation of Cage Culture of Asian Seabass and Mullets in Coastal West Bengal (AINP on Mariculture) Dr. Bipul Kumar Das 2014-2016 ICAR, New Delhi 43.000
  • Research Findings

    Project Research Findings
    Development of Climate-Resilient Aquaculture Strategies for Sagar and Basanti Blocks of Indian Sundarban (NICRA) For the year 2014-15, four programmes were taken up – (i) survival and growth performances of few brackish water fish species in freshwater (ii) survival and growth performances of 11 fresh water fish species at different salinity, (iii) development climate-resilient aquaculture strategies for better adaptation to conditions brought about through climate change, notably increased salinity  and (iv) strengthen the capacity of fish farmers to prepare and respond effectively to future climate-induced changes .

    • Macrobrachium rosenbergii was found to be the most tolerant species followed by Channa punctatus, Puntius javanicus, Cyprinus carpio, Puntius sarana, Labeo rohita, Cirrhinus mrigala, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Catla catla, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Labeo bata.
    • Eight brackish water species viz., Liza parsia, Scatophagus argus, Liza tade, Terapon jarbua, Etroplus suratensis, Mystus gulio and Penaeus monodon thrived well and grew satisfactorily in freshwater.
    • Climate Resilient Species combinations for the salinity intrusion zone of Sundarban  were finalised
    • Climate adaptive integrated farming technique  through incorporating salt tolerant fish, livestok, horticulture and crop varieties were developed
    • Trial Fish feed (to combat salinity stress) for demonstration was developed (total energy-3000 kcal/kg.) with the ingredients of soya meal, fish meal, wheat bran, vegetable oil, vitamin, mineral, immunostimulant. Irrespective of species and salinity levels, this high energy feed exhibited significantly better growth than normal feed.
    • Two farmers training cum demonstration on “Climate Resilient Aquaculture for Sundarban” was conducted.
    • Climate Resilient Species combinations for the salinity intrusion zone of Sundarban
    • Based on species specific salinity tolerance and adaptability study; post-flooding growth performance of freshwater fish and survival and growth performance of brackish water fish in freshwater trial and growth and production trend obtained so far the following species combinations are proposed for different saline water flooding prone zones of the Sundarban:
    • Species suitable for areas vulnerable to low saline water flooding (upto 5 ppt) : i)Labeo rohita ii) Catla catla iii) Cyprinus carpio iv) Ctenopharyngodon idella v) Hypophthalmichthys molitrix vi) Macrobrachium rosenbergii vii) Puntius javanicus viii) Penaeus monodon ix) Terapon  jarbua x) Scatophagous argus xi) Liza parsia
    • Species suitable for areas vulnerable to medium saline water flooding (upto 10 ppt):  i)Labeo rohita ii) Puntius javanicus iii) Cyprinus carpio iv) Macrobrachium rosenbergii v) Puntius sarana vi) Ctenopharyngodon idella vii) Cirrhinus mrigala viii) Penaeus monodon ix) Terapon  jarbua x) Scatophagous argus xi) Mystus gulio
    • Species suitable for areas vulnerable to high saline water flooding (above 10 ppt): i) Cyprinus carpio ii) Puntius javanicus iii) Penaeus monodon iv) Terapon jarbua v) Scatophagous argus vi) Macrobrachium rosenbergii vii) Etroplus suratensis viii) Liza parsia ix)Mugil cephalus x) Mystus gulio

    Climate adaptive integrated farming: In order to enhance the resilience among the marginal fish farmers of Sundarban, livestock crop integration with aquaculture as Climate Adaptive Integrated Farming (CAIF) has been tried and was found not only profitable but has been able to make the system more resilient towards extreme events due to climate change. Incorporation of salt tolerant fruits and horticultural crops with salt tolerant aquacultural species has resulted in better economic ret

    Determination of the conservation value of the Mangroves of Indian Sunderban The Indian Sundarban mangrove forest covers an area of about 4,267 sq km which is administratively divided into Sundarban Tiger Reserve (STR; 2585 sq km) and 24-Parganas (South) Forest Division (1682 sq km). About 1,255 sq km of the Tiger Reserve area serves as the buffer zone, where limited fishing activities are permitted with prior permission of the Forest Department.

    Rest of the mangrove area is spread over parts of two districts viz. North 24- Parganas and 24-Parganas (South), covering 19 community development blocks, 190 Gram Panchayats and 1064 villages with human settlements. The present survey work was carried out for the 69 mangrove patches (613 nos of sub patches) spread over 10 community development blocks with the total area of 153.2596 sq km approximately. The average area of each patch is 2.23 sq km. This is the first time that this kind of comprehensive survey work (Rapid Biodiversity Inventory) to assess the status of mangroves, its associated flora and associated fauna were carried to find out their conservation values. Most of the patches falling in eastern sector were sparse in nature whereas many of the patches of central and western sectors were dense in nature. During the survey we observed that the diversity was more in central and western sector compared to eastern sector. The eastern sector patches are planted ones and have more human pressure compared to the patches of central and western sectors.

    It has been observed that people settled around the patches have become more alert in protecting the nearby patches. However at few sites we could observe reclamation of land after clearing the existing mangroves for aquaculture purposes, house construction and also cutting of trees or branches for their local needs. At many patches, especially in eastern sector, we didn’t find many seedlings due to grazing by livestocks. We could also observe wide spread catching of prawn seeds by local villagers using cloth type small drag nets having very small mesh size. During this process there has been wide spread destruction of seeds of other fishes also.

    Overall diversity among mangroves and associate flora and fauna have been found to be more in central and western sector compared to eastern sector. However, compared to previous years, the diversity seems to have come down drastically.

    It has also been observed that many hotels have already been built or being constructed near to these patches and the number of tourists and tourist boats have increased many folds during last few years.

    Development of Seed Bank and Propagation of Cage Culture of Asian Seabass and Mullets in Coastal West Bengal (AINP on Mariculture)