• Departmental profile

    Optimum utilization and sustainable development of fishery resources through water-quality management and eco-system improvement is widely acknowledged priority area of our country. Keeping this fact in mind the Department of Aquatic Environment Management (AEM) has developed its course curriculum for Undergraduate and Post graduate with emphasis on adequate knowledge of water and soil quality monitoring, management of aquatic environment and eco-system improvement. The Department has laboratory facilities with various equipments and expertise to make students technically sound with knowledge in –

    1. Physicochemical and biological analysis of freshwater and saline water.
    2. Analysis, monitoring and management strategies of aquatic pollution.
    3. Ecotoxicological studies.
    4. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)
    5. Coastal Zone Management and Climate resilient strategies.

    In addition to normal undergraduate programme the department is also offering M. F. Sc. program with an intake capacity of 6 students per year since 1999 and has started the Ph. D. program in the year 2010 with an intake capacity of 3 students per year.

  • Faculty Member

    Faculty: Faculty of Fishery Sciences
    Head of the Department. : Prof. Sangram Keshari Rout

    DR. RAMAN KUMAR TRIVEDI

    Qualification : M.F.Sc. & Ph. D.
    Designation : Professor
    Email : ramankumart@rediffmail.com
    Phone : +91 9432491149

    PUBLICATIONS

    National: 24
    International: 13
    Popular Article: 0
    Manual: 01
    Books/ Books Chapter: 01

    STUDENT GUIDANCE

    Master Degree: 18
    Post Doctoral: 01

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    DR. SANGRAM KESHARI ROUT

    Qualification : M.F.Sc. & Ph. D.
    Designation : Professor
    Phone: +91 8100682955
    Mail ID: skrout68@gmail.com

    PUBLICATIONS

    National: 49
    International: 11
    Popular Articles: 0
    Manual: 0
    Books/ Books Chapter: 02

    STUDENT GUIDANCE

    Master Degree: 22
    Post Doctoral: 03

     View Detail Profile
  • Course

    Course offered:

    Undergraduate Programme
    Course No. Course Title Credit Hours
    AEM–111 Meteorology, Climatology and geography 1+1
    AEM–112 Soil and Water Chemistry 2+1
    AEM–123 Limnology 2+1
    AEM–124 Aquatic Ecology and Biodiversity 1+1
    AEM–215 Marine Biology 2+1
    AEM–216 Fishery Oceanography 1+1
    AEM–317 Coastal Zone Management and Disaster Management 2+1
    AEM-328 Aquatic Pollution 1+1
    Post-Graduate Programme
    Course No. Course Title Credit Hours
    AEM-501 Aquatic Environment and Biodiversity 2+1
    AEM-502 Chemical Interactions in The Aquatic Environment 2+1
    AEM-503 Integrated Coastal Zone Management 2+1
    AEM-504 Aquatic Pollution and Wastewater Management 2+1
    AEM-505 Ecology And Management of Limnetic Environment 2+1
    AEM-507 Environmental Toxicology 1+1
    AEM-511 Aquatic  Microbiology 2+1
    Ph D Programme
    Course No. Course Title Credit Hours
    AEM-601 Advances in Aquatic Environmental Studies 2+1
    AEM-602 Biotechnology for Cleaner Environment 1+1
    AEM-603 Benthic Ecology 1+1
    AEM-604 Estuarine and Coastal Oceanography 2+1
    AEM-606 Environment Impact Assessment 1+1
    AEM-607 Management and Utilization of Wastewater 2+1
  • Project Completed / ongoing

    Ongoing
    Sl.No. Title Name of PI Period Funding Agency Budget (Rs. in lakhs)
    1 All India Network Project on Mariculture Prof. B. K. Das 2015-2017 CMFRI, ICAR, New Delhi 65.30
    Completed
    Sl.No. Title Name of PI Period Funding Agency Budget (Rs. in lakhs)
    1 Development of Climate-Resilient Aquaculture Strategies for Sagar and Basanti Blocks of Indian Sundarban Prof. R. K. Trivedi 2010-2015 NICRA, ICAR, New Delhi 125.00
    2 Determination of the conservation value of the Mangroves of Indian Sunderban Prof. R. K. Trivedi Nine Months NCSCM Ministry of Environment & Forests Govt. of India 11.00
    3 Assessment of Extent of Community Dependence on the Coastal Ecologically Sensitive Areas (ESAS) in Sundarban, West Bengal and Bhitarkanika, Odissa Prof. R. K. Trivedi Eight Months NCSCM Ministry of Environment & Forests Govt. of India 12.00
  • Research Findings

    Project Name: Development of Climate-resilient Aquaculture Strategies for Sagar & Basanti Blocks of Indian Sundarban

    1. Macrobrachium rosenbergii was found to be the most tolerant species followed by Channa punctatus, Puntius javanicus, Cyprinus carpio, Puntius sarana, Labeo rohita, Cirrhinus mrigala, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Catla catla, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Labeo bata.
    2. Eight brackish water species viz., Liza parsia, Scatophagus argus, Liza tade, Terapon jarbua, Etroplus suratensis, Mystus gulio and Penaeus monodon thrived well and grew satisfactorily in freshwater.
    1. Climate Resilient Species combinations for the salinity intrusion zone of Sundarban were finalised.
    2. Climate adaptive integrated farming technique  through incorporating salt tolerant fish, livestok, horticulture and crop varieties were developed.
    3. Trial Fish feed (to combat salinity stress) for demonstration was developed (total energy-3000 kcal/kg.) with the ingredients of soya meal, fish meal, wheat bran, vegetable oil, vitamin, mineral, immunostimulant. Irrespective of species and salinity levels, this high energy feed exhibited significantly better growth than normal feed.
    4. Two farmers training cum demonstration on “Climate Resilient Aquaculture for Sundarban” was conducted.
    5. Climate Resilient Species combinations for the salinity intrusion zone of Sundarban: Based on species specific salinity tolerance and adaptability study; post-flooding growth performance of freshwater fish and survival and growth performance of brackish water fish in freshwater trial and growth and production trend obtained so far the following species combinations are proposed for different saline water flooding prone zones of the Sundarban:
    • Species suitable for areas vulnerable to low saline water flooding (upto 5 ppt): i)Labeo rohita ii) Catla catla iii) Cyprinus carpio iv) Ctenopharyngodon idella v) Hypophthalmichthys molitrix vi) Macrobrachium rosenbergii vii) Puntius javanicus viii) Penaeus monodon ix) Terapon  jarbua x) Scatophagous argus xi) Liza parsia
    • Species suitable for areas vulnerable to medium saline water flooding (upto 10 ppt): i)Labeo rohita ii) Puntius javanicus iii) Cyprinus carpio iv) Macrobrachium rosenbergii v) Puntius sarana vi) Ctenopharyngodon idella vii) Cirrhinus mrigala viii) Penaeus monodon ix) Terapon  jarbua x) Scatophagous argus xi) Mystus gulio
    • Species suitable for areas vulnerable to high saline water flooding (above 10 ppt): i) Cyprinus carpio ii) Puntius javanicus iii) Penaeus monodon iv) Terapon jarbua v) Scatophagous argus vi) Macrobrachium rosenbergii vii) Etroplus suratensis viii) Liza parsia ix)Mugil cephalus x) Mystus gulio

           8. Climate adaptive integrated farming: In order to enhance the resilience among the marginal fish farmers of Sundarban, livestock crop integration with aquaculture as Climate Adaptive Integrated Farming (CAIF) has been tried and was found not only profitable but has been able to make the system more resilient towards extreme events due to climate change. Incorporation of salt tolerant fruits and horticultural crops with salt tolerant aquacultural species has resulted in better economic returns, capacity enhancement and reduced risk. This is achieved through land shaping, reclamation, re-excavation of ponds including 3-tier step-cutting or terracing on inward slopes of the ponds. Plantation on the top of the dyke has resulted in its strengthening.

    Project Name: Determination of the conservation value of the Mangroves of Indian Sunderban

    • A first time rapid field Biodiversity Inventory survey work to assess the status of mangroves and its associated flora and fauna falling outside protected areas of Indian Sundarban was carried out in the 69 mangrove patches (613 nos of sub patches) spread over 10 community development blocks with the total area of 153.2596 sq km approximately. The average area of each patch was 2.23 sq km.
    • Most of the patches falling in eastern sector were sparse in nature whereas many of the patches of central and western sectors were dense in nature. Diversity was more in central and western sector compared to eastern sector. This may be due to most of eastern sector patches are planted ones and have more human pressure compared to the patches of central and western sectors. Many patches were so dense that it was very difficult to enter inside.
    • The survey yielded a total 33 numbers of floral communities, of which 13 belonged to true mangrove distributed among 10 families. 20 mangrove associates, salt marshes, sea grasses, other brackish water aquatics, sand binders etc were also found during the survey. Apart from floral community, more than 20 genera of benthic macrofauna were also documented from the outside protected areas of Sundarban.
    • Overall diversity among mangroves and associate flora and fauna have been found to be more in central and western sector compared to eastern sector. However, compared to previous years, the diversity seems to have come down drastically.

    Project Name: Assessment of Extent of Community Dependence on the Coastal Ecologically Sensitive  Areas (ESAS) in Sundarban, West Bengal and Bhitarkanika, Odissa

    A comprehensive survey work to assess the status of community dependence on the Coastal Ecological Sensitive Area (ESA) of Sundarban, West Bengal and Bhitarkanika, Odissa was carried out and the data analysis is going on. A total number of 2350 households covering 56 villages within 11 community development blocks falling near Coastal Ecological Sensitive Area (ESA) of Sundarban, West Bengal and A total number of 1325 households covering 166 villages within 4 community development blocks falling near Coastal Ecological Sensitive Area (ESA) of Bhitarkanika, Odissa have been surveyed in this study